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When it comes to yoga, there are three kinds of people: devotees who can tadasana until the sun comes up, people who will never be cajoled onto a yoga mat, and those curious dabblers who would like …

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When it comes to yoga, there are three kinds of people: devotees who can tadasana until the sun comes up, people who will never be cajoled onto a yoga mat, and those curious dabblers who would like to know more, but have no idea how to choose between Vinyasa, Iyengar and Hatha. For this third category, there’s the Yoga and Pilates Passport, made by Jenn Thomas and Jennifer Spaziano of Rhode to Wellness. “It’s really hard to know what kind of yoga to go to," Jenn says, "It keeps a lot of people from even trying it, because it’s daunting.” The passport is basically a pass into hundreds of yoga and pilates classes around the state, either for free or at a hefty discount. As anyone who’s been to a few classes can attest, yoga gets pricey, and fast. “Part of my interest in this project is that we both understand that there’s so much more to yoga,” Jenn says. “Having the encouragement to go try out all different kinds is really beneficial on so many levels, because you’re choosing what’s best for your own fitness, whether you need to build strength in your own body, or engage with the more spiritual side of practice.” The statewide book encourages people to try different studios and find what fits best for them, if they decide they like knowing their way around warrior one and warrior two poses. As Jenn says, “Rhode Island is amazing with how much yoga we have here. I can’t live without it. It’s really a way of life for me. It reminds me to be mindful everywhere.”